Bryn Rouse

 Artwork: Bryn Rouse

Artwork: Bryn Rouse

Bryn Rouse draws things. They’re usually in pen, and they’re always very cool. He creates elegantly simple yet charmingly-detailed drawings of animals, plants, food items and more. You may have seen some of his work on a can of Creature Comforts’ Epicurious, a shirt from Five & Ten, or on a shirt, the coasters and even the walls of The National. He also dabbled a bit in some red and blue 3D-type line work in the form of a Godzilla.

While honorably helping with his roommate’s three dogs, Oso, Zara and Pico, he doesn’t currently have a pet companion of his own. He still has fond memories of his childhood English Bulldog, Max, who was unfortunately gone way too soon in their partnership. But some future fur friend plans include possibly a dog or cat. More excitingly a goat, pig, or in true Georgia fashion, maybe even some chickens, aren’t out of the question.

Bryn’s love for art has always been there. But he got a boost of confidence in fourth grade when he won the second place title in a regional art competition with a drawing of a tiger done in graphite. After that, he “doodled” all the way to age 22 where his job as a bartender at The National found him kicking back after work with bar napkins and his ballpoint pen. When his boss, Peter Dale, noticed the drawings one night, Bryn was commissioned to design a postcard that could be handed out to regulars, and his current artistic endeavor blossomed from there.

 Artwork: Bryn Rouse

Artwork: Bryn Rouse

Other than getting to design Creature Comforts can art on Epicurious (although Bibo is his #1 favorite), and getting to draw a bison that now hangs on the wall of The National, another high point of life as an artist is getting asked to draw tattoo ideas for friends. He says this is an honor and to see his work on someone’s skin is moving. 

While he does love it, Bryn hopes to be able to cut his full-time food service industry job back some in the next few years and devote a lot more time to making a more expansive career out of his art. And since he’s a man of many talents, he would also love to get into some acting and music.

When it comes to the challenges of being an artist, Bryn says the hardest part used to be transitioning from drawing something for fun versus drawing something “as a task.” Overthinking, putting too much pressure on himself, and taking on any and all assignments are things he had to learn to overcome. But he now says, “The best way to make the best art is to channel your heart and the joy of creative expression into your work and to not view projects as tasks but rather as creative outlets.” To keep it simple, he says now he typically only agrees to draw things he knows he can execute well. 

You can find more of Bryn Rouse’s work on his Instagram page @brynscritterz or on his website at brynscritterz.com.